Vehicle part manufacturer fined after worker injured

Tuesday January 03, 2012
Written by Manufacturing AUTOMATION
KSR International Co., carrying on business as Dresden Industrial-Ridgetown, a maker of vehicle parts, was fined $50,000 for a violation of the Occupational Health and Safety Act after a worker was injured.

On May 20, 2010, at the company's facility in Ridgetown, a worker was trying to fix a press that was not working. The worker entered the press to determine the problem and correct it. When the press started working again, it closed on part of the worker's hand, injuring the worker.

A Ministry of Labour investigation found that the worker had not used a block to stop the press from moving.

KSR International Co., carrying on business as Dresden Industrial-Ridgetown, pleaded guilty to failing to ensure the press had maintenance work preformed on it only after it had been blocked to prevent its movement.

The fine was imposed by Justice of the Peace Michael Hurst. In addition to the fine, the court imposed a 25 percent victim fine surcharge, as required by the Provincial Offences Act. The surcharge is credited to a special provincial government fund to assist victims of crime.

Comments 

 
+1 #3 Bill Valedis 2012-01-05 09:23
Doug,
It is unfortunate that we [the manufacturing community] in Canada, see training as an unnecessary expense rather than an investment, helping to reduce manufacturing costs and reduce accidents. It seems that some manufacturers don't train their people. Its insane that some manufacturers have eliminated training AND do not have Safe Work Instructions in place to protect workers from injury. This is definitely a ticking time-bomb that when it explodes due to inefficiencies or fatality, we all lose on the world competitive stage.

Happy New Year to all...

Quoting Doug Wilson:
It is sad that we receive news such as this on a seemingly daily basis. Although liability of the company is one aspect, the skill and knowledge level of the worker is another worth taking into account.
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+1 #2 Andrew Stevens 2012-01-04 12:57
I agree that it is very sad that someone has had an accident in a factory - but the government's solution to fine the company (plus an extra fine for "victims of crimes)
makes no sense at all! Properly training operators & skilled maintenance workers are what is required in factories - neither of which we have an abundance of. The Ontario Government should be assisting companies with the proper training costs for these skilled workers rather than
punishing the companies with excessive fines - giving many owners reasons to either close up or move from Ontario to other more-friendly manufacturing places. It seems the Ontario Government & Ministry of Labour only seem to know how to increase the costs for the manufacturing sector rather than working with them to decrease costings and assist the workers with keeping their jobs. Ontario is the safest place in North America to manufacture and has the highest unemployment and production costs.
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+3 #1 Doug Wilson 2012-01-04 11:15
It is sad that we receive news such as this on a seemingly daily basis. Although liability of the company is one aspect, the skill and knowledge level of the worker is another worth taking into account. No person would ever be allowed to work on an electrical system unless they were a qualified specialist however no training whatsoever is required to allow a person to work on systems such as hydraulics which have as high if not higher potential for injury if incorrectly isolated. Your article does not state specifically that this was a hydraulic press however the principle of isolating potential energy exists by virtue of either gravity or hydraulic accumulators which are both silent dangers. It is my belief that it is sending the wrong message to make employers accountable to "ensure that it (the press) had been blocked to prevent its movement" when instead they should be held accountable to ensure that workers are properly trained on the equipment which they are expected to work on
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