Artificial Intelligence
Jan. 22, 2018 - The lure of Montreal’s burgeoning artificial intelligence hub is helping the city to attract highly skilled talent even though Quebec is facing historically low unemployment, officials from tech giants like Google and Microsoft and municipal officials said at an AI conference.
Jan. 12, 2018 - The world is rapidly moving toward Industry 4.0 or the Fourth Industrial Revolution, where artificial intelligence (AI) and machine-learning based systems are not only changing the ways we interact with information and computers but also revolutionizing the manufacturing sector.
Jan. 9, 2018 - China is planning to build a 13.8 billion yuan (C$2.6 billion) artificial intelligence (AI) development park, according to Xinhua news agency.
Dec. 14, 2017 - The artificial intelligence researcher who called artificial intelligence (AI) the new electricity is now trying to make sure every company is plugged in.
Dec. 13, 2017 - Apple is investing $390 million in Finisar, a company that makes lasers used in facial recognition technology.
Nov. 3, 2017 - Rockwell Automation today announced its investment in The Hive, a Silicon Valley innovation fund and co-creation studio, to gain access to an ecosystem of innovators and technology startups with a focus on applications of artificial intelligence (AI) to industrial automation.
Oct. 2, 2017 - Some of the biggest names in tech are lining up to join Montreal’s burgeoning artificial intelligence cluster, but harnessing the sector’s full potential depends on creating homegrown tech champions, not just celebrating investments by large multinationals, warns one of Canada’s godfathers of deep learning.
Sep. 25, 2017 - A new report by Future Market Insights studies the performance of the global artificial intelligence (AI) systems spending market over a 10-year assessment period from 2017 to 2027.
Aug. 21, 2017 - Triassic Solutions Private Limited (TSPL), an engineering services and manufacturing automation company, has opened artificial intelligence (AI) research facilities in Toronto, Ont., and Pleasanton, Calif., to serve the semiconductor, healthcare and retail industries.
Jul. 25, 2017 - Tech titans Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk recently slugged it out online over the possible threat artificial intelligence (AI) might one day pose to the human race, although you could be forgiven if you don’t see why this seems like a pressing question.
Jun. 14, 2017 - A Montreal startup said it is getting US$102 million from Microsoft, Intel and several other investors to fund the company’s goal of becoming a leader in artificial intelligence, an industry seen as becoming an increasingly important part of the Canadian economy.
Apr. 26, 2017 - At Hannover Messe 2017, ABB and IBM announced a strategic collaboration that brings together ABB’s digital offering — ABB Ability — with IBM Watson Internet of Things cognitive capabilities to “unlock new value for customers in utilities, industry, transport and infrastructure.”
Apr. 3, 2017 - Magna has announced it is investing $5 million into the Vector Institute, a new independent artificial intelligence (AI) research facility which launched last week in Toronto, Ont.
Mar. 20, 2017 - Everyone’s talking about problems hurting workers. In the last U.S. election, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton argued about reasons for a historic disruption in the labour market. The Canadian government will explore it in Wednesday’s budget.
Research at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden and Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden has resulted in a new type of machine that sorts used batteries by means of artificial intelligence (AI). One machine is now being used in the UK, sorting one-third of the country's recycled batteries. “I got the idea at home when I was sorting rubbish. I thought it should be possible to do it automatically with artificial intelligence,” says Claes Strannegård, who is an AI researcher at the University of Gothenburg and Chalmers University of Technology. Strannegård contacted the publically owned recycling company Renova in Gothenburg, Sweden, who were positive to an R&D project concerning automatic sorting of collected batteries. The collaboration resulted in a machine that uses computerised optical recognition to sort up to ten batteries per second. The sorting is made possible by the machine's so-called neural network, which can be thought of as an artificial nervous system. Just like a human brain, the neural network must be trained to do what it is supposed to do. In this case, the machine has been trained to recognize about 2,000 different types of batteries by taking pictures of them from all possible angles. As the batteries are fed into the machine via a conveyor belt, they are 'visually inspected' by the machine via a camera. The neural network identifies the batteries in just a few milliseconds by comparing the picture taken with pictures taken earlier. The network is self-learning and robust, making it possible to recognise batteries even if they are dirty or damaged. Once the batteries have been identified, compressed air separates them into different containers according to chemical content, such as nickel-cadmium or lithium. “For each single battery, the system stores and spits out information about for example brand, model and type. This allows the recycler to tell a larger market exactly what types of material it can offer, which we believe may increase the value through increased competition,” says Hans-Eric Melin, CEO of the Gothenburg-based company Optisort, which has developed the machine. This means that besides the environmental benefits of the machine, there are commercial benefits. Today the collection and sorting companies are actually paying money to get rid of the batteries. But Melin thinks that real-time battery data could spark a new market for battery waste, where large volumes are traded online. So far, the company has delivered two machines – one to Renova in Gothenburg (where half of all the batteries collected in Sweden are sorted) and one to G&P Batteries in the UK. The interest in Optisort and its machine is rising and Strannegård, who founded the company, is very happy his idea is turning out to work so well in the real world. “This is sparking further research and development so that we will eventually use artificial intelligence to sort all types of waste,” he says.

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